Hawksbill sea turtle (Eretmochelys imbricata) silhouette
  All sea turtles are air breathers requiring them to breath-hold the entire time they are underwater. Their physiology is well adapted to the marine environment thus allowing them to stay submerged for sustainable periods of time. While active, a hawksbill sea turtle was recorded staying submerged for 56 minutes. While inactive (ie. sleeping), sea turtles have been recorded to last from 2 to 5 hours on a single breath of air.  

Sea turtle on coral reef
  Sea turtles depend on a healthy coral reef to provide them with food and shelter. This juvenile hawksbill sea turtle in Palm Beach, Florida feeds primarily on the sponges growing on the reef.  

Sea turtle hatchling hyperactive swimming
  When a sea turtle hatchling enters the ocean it undergoes a period of hyperactive swimming during which it swims nonstop for up to three days.  

Baby leatherback sea turtles
  A leatherback sea turtle was tracked traveling over 12,700 miles, the longest recorded migration of any known vertebrate, from the nesting beaches of Papua to the foraging shores off Oregon. The baby leatherback sea turtle in this photo begins its life off the east coast of Florida and will travel as far north as eastern Canada to its foraging grounds. As soon as the sea turtle leaves its nest it will begin a nonstop swimming frenzy that can last for many days. This swimming frenzy allows the baby sea turtle to quickly swim passed the nearshore reefs where predators abound. The baby sea turtle will get the energy it needs to accomplish this feat from the remains of its egg yolk. Learn more about baby leatherback sea turtles.  

Baby leatherback sea turtles
  Baby leatherback sea turtles hatch from their eggs laid deep under the sand in about two months. A leatherback sea turtle lays an average of 100 eggs in a nest chamber. Due to predation and human causes, many of these baby leatherback sea turtles will not reach adulthood. Those leatherbacks sea turtles that do survive will return to nest near the same beach where they were born approxiamately sixteen years later. Learn more about leatherback sea turtles.  

Largest density of sea turtle nests in the United States
  The beaches of Palm Beach County have some of the largest density of sea turtle nests in the United States. This stretch of beach covers an area of 40.7 miles. They are the nesting site for the loggerhead, green, and leatherback sea turtles. Over 25,000 nests were laid by these sea turtles in the year 2012 alone. Learn more about these sea turtle nests.  

Previous Images
  • Hawksbill sea turtle (Eretmochelys imbricata) silhouette
  • Sea turtle on coral reef
  • Sea turtle hatchling hyperactive swimming
  • Baby leatherback sea turtles
  • Baby leatherback sea turtles
  • Largest density of sea turtle nests in the United States
px
More Images

 

Instagram icn-facebook3