Hawksbill sea turtle swimming towards the camera
  Sea turtles, such as this hawksbill sea turtle (Eretmochelys imbricata), are air breathers and must come up to the surface to breathe. They are capable of holding their breath for hours depending on their activity level. When resting or sleeping they can hold their breath for as long as 4-7 hours.  

Green sea turtle hatchling entering the ocean
  Baby sea turtles, such as this green sea turtle, usually climb out of their sandy nest at night time when they are less likely to be eaten by predators. An average of 100 baby sea turtles emerge from the sand in a coordinated effort. They use numerous cues to locate the ocean such as the natural glow of light on the ocean's horizon, the beach slope, and some scientist believe, the low frequency sounds produced by the ocean's crashing waves. Artificial lighting from beachfront property as well as the metropolitan city glow is a major problem for baby sea turtles as it can disorient them into the dunes and nearby city streets. Learn more about baby sea turtles.  

Green sea turtle hatchling in the ocean
  It is believed that sea turtle hatchlings, such as this green sea turtle, locate the ocean because they are phototactic - they are attracted to light. At night, without any man-made lights to confuse them, the glow from the ocean reflects the brightest ambient light. Sea turtle hatchlings will avoid dark areas, such as the dune, as this is the area where predators abound. Learn more about sea turtle navigation.  

Loggerhead sea turtle hatchlings
  Florida is the largest nesting site in the world for the endangered loggerhead sea turtle. In 2012, the state totals for loggerhead sea turtle nests were 98,601. Each nest contains an average of about 100 eggs. Learn more about loggerhead sea turtles.  

Close up photograph of a magnificent urchin
  Sea urchins belong to the phylum Echinodermata (common name Echinoderm), which also include sea stars and sea cucumbers. There are approximately 7000 described species of Echinoderms living only in marine environments.  

Coral-covered ship wreck
  The offshore waters off West Palm Beach are a suitable habitat most marine life. Any new real estate, such as this ship wreck, are quickly colonized with corals, sponges, and fish life.  

Previous Images
  • Hawksbill sea turtle swimming towards the camera
  • Green sea turtle hatchling entering the ocean
  • Green sea turtle hatchling in the ocean
  • Loggerhead sea turtle hatchlings
  • Close up photograph of a magnificent urchin
  • Coral-covered ship wreck
px
More Images

 

Instagram